Before the Digital Camera

Before digital cameras hit the photography market, I spent hours developing film, mixing chemicals, and printing images. My childhood Brownie was eventually replaced.  As we all did, I advanced to a 35 mm camera with lenses and filters. I still admire the work of early photographers who most likely never dreamed of a digital age. My post of a few black & white portraits deserve the light of day. Released from negative strips, contact sheets, and 3-ring binders out they go into the Universe. (Perhaps not quite that far.) The portraits are of friends, neighbors, and people I met along the way.

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Water – Precious to All

Tucson’s post-summer temperatures have been high – think climate change. Javelinas, bobcats, owls, rabbits, coyotes, Gambrel quails, doves all need water. The animals have a water dish available all day and all night. In exchange, I have the option to record their visits.

For images, I use a Browning trail camera (Model BTC-5HD). I wind the strap around a nearby tree, and flip the battery button. The camera eye responds to motion and records every flick of a feather. The six AA batteries store enough energy for several months.

I’m posting images taken at the end of April and early May. Javelina are thirsty creatures and will drink the saucer dry. When that happens, the other animals must wait until morning for a refill. My daytime wish for a hawk to drop in has not happened. However, my powers of wishful thinking will eventually bring a big bird to the dish. In the meanwhile, consider the challenges desert creatures endure every single day. Water is precious to all.

In a Few Words . . . .

An information sign works best when stated in a few words. For example: a speed limit sign. Whenever a sign designer’s creativity clicks with me, I’ll take a picture. That brings me to today. While the corona virus encourages me to keep socially distant, I’ve had time to make a slide presentation. The image “Evolution and Psychology . . . ” taken in a northern Virginia suburb was shared by a friend, John McC. who also likes signs.

May the images bring a smile and brighten the moment for you.

Stay safe everyone.

1962 Bel Air Chevrolet – Rhyolite, NV

An easy seven miles on Route 374 separate Rhyolite, NV from Death Valley National Park. Set into the Bullfrog Hills, the mining town was abandoned in 1920. Still the site invites curious travelers to scout the area for whatever catches their eye. Chain link fencing surrounds the train station, an old caboose has nowhere to go, and the concrete shell of a bank building looms large. I gave all my attention to a ’62 Chevrolet with a rusted firewall.

The old Chevy has held up despite the affects of oxidation. Its firewall displays beautiful compositions in line, color, and texture.

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Hudson Yards – NYC

    October is a great time to visit the city. Plan a trip that includes the Open House New York (www.ohny.org) weekend. Events take place in the five boroughs. More than 250 historic, cultural, and architectural sites opened their doors to welcome visitors in 2019.

The newest attraction on Manhattan’s west side – Hudson Yards (30th Street to 43rd), made my Top 10 list. Promoted as a place to live, shop, and work, the site comes with caveats. The first city-based Neiman Marcus welcomes shoppers ready to open their wallets. The Shed, a $475 million cultural center, will excite even the New Yorker who has seen it all.

The Vessel at Hudson Yards – 2,500 steps. Eighty landings. Elevator available.

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Food vendors are always nearby.
Construction site at Hudson Yards

 

Thanks for viewing.

 

 

Jack Beal Mosaics – Times Square

New York City, ever an adventure in art, culture, and life itself, came to the fore in the 41st IRT subway (7th Avenue). The much-admired Jack Beal (1931 – 2013) mosaics have, no doubt, been photographed many, many times. I had to have my own images of The Onset of Winter and The Return of Spring. The murals depict the Greek myth of Persephone, the goddess of spring. Kidnapped by Hades, she was forced to live in the underground for half of the year. Demeter, her mother and goddess of harvest, asked Zeus to intervene. Long story – Persephone and her mother were reunited for half of the year. Thus, earth has six months of springtime and summer.